Black-Owned Company Selling Herbal Solution For Erectile Dysfunction Now Has A Product For Women

Nationwide — Alpha RX Plus LLC, an African American owned company that sells a popular all-natural product for men with erectile dysfunction, has also launched a new product for women called Alpha Moist & Tight.
CEO J.R. Scroggins says the product was put into the market due to the response and request of their existing male customers. He says he’s had conversations with customers who said their wives who would also love to have a product that would help them to be more comfortable during passionate moments.

Alpha Moist & Tight is also an all-natural product made from herbs, and serves several functions for women. It is a cream that acts as a lubricant, provides a fresh clean scent, and is also designed to tighten the vagina and surrounding muscles.

Scroggins comments, “Some women are opting for vagina tightening surgery, which can be expensive. And not all doctors practicing this procedure are experts due to the relative newness of this type of surgery.”

The procedure he is referring to is called Labia Plasty, and is performed to shape and tighten the enlarged (Minora and Mijora). Some women are born with this enlargement, and some experience it after giving birth.

Alpha Moist & Tight, however, is an all-natural solution to this problem and is designed to give the vagina a youthful appearance again.

For more information and/or to place an order, visit:
www.alpharxplus.com/Alpha_Moist___Tight.html

PRESS CONTACT:
Alpha RX Plus, LLC
jrscroggins@alpharxplus.com
800-860-1938

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More Than 50 Years of Promoting Fast Food and Cigarettes to Black People

Nationwide — In addition to drugs and alcohol, fast food and cigarettes are some of the most harmful elements to minority communities. Because of this, African American families in particular, end up with the most health-related problems including heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, kidney disease/ failure, mental illnesses, and more.

Sadly, none of this is new. It’s been going on for decades. Need proof? Below are some advertisements from the 1950’s, 1960’s and 1970’s that were specifically designed for Black consumers:

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5 Things Black Women Should Know About Mental Health Counseling

African American women are known by many as one of the strongest groups of women in the world,mentally. But what happens when their mental health takes a turn for the unusual? According to a recently released report from the National Center for Health Statistics, U.S. women are more likely than men to experience serious mental health challenges.  Black women in particular, like many Black men, typically avoid the outside advice of a mental health professional when stress starts to affect their mood, activity, sleep, eating habits or weight. Black women often deny mental and physical changes; typically suppress their feelings and even harmful thoughts for fear of being seen as weak or crazy.

Though there seems to be a rise in the number of millennials who seek counseling for stress or other psychic pain, these numbers have not warranted enough attention for the medical industry to research more effective treatment and prevention for people of color, in particular, women of color. Therefore, as a treating provider, I have compiled a list of five things Black women should know about mental health:

1. Seeking mental health counseling or life coaching is not a sign that you’re weak or “crazy.” It means that you or someone close to you notice that there are significant changes in your thinking, behaving and lifestyle and it may warrant the advisement and guidance of a professional.

2. When you avoid seeking help for persistent mood changes, personality changes and changes in thinking, including having thoughts of harming yourself or others, you risk those symptoms worsening, making treatment that much more difficult to impact the chemical reactions in the brain once a regimen begins.

3. Mental health treatment not only impacts the person seeking help but it has a direct impact on the individual, her family and her community. Mental health treatment provides options for exactly what treatment might be right for that person, such as individual or family psychotherapy, a support group, spiritual counseling, psychoanalysis, electric convulsive therapy or medication. There’s no one size fits all plan for everybody!

4. Women who receive mental health counseling at an early onset of symptoms for the most part perform better at work, generally get along well with others, cope better with stress and have overall satisfying and productive lives.

5. And finally, just because there’s still a stigma in the Black and Latino communities about mental health treatment, it doesn’t mean that people aren’t thinking about getting help. It does mean, however, that we’re still not openly talking about it. You may be surprised to discover how your personal disclosure about seeking professional help could inspire someone else to get the help that they need.

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10 Tips to Help You Loss Weight

It’s the time of year when food is in abundance and messing up your diet is easy to do. But with a little planning and some tough love, staying committed to your weight loss goals is completely possible.

Steve Siebold, author of the international bestsellers “Die Fat or Get Tough: 101 Differences in Thinking Between Fat People and Fit People” and “Fat Loser! Mental Toughness Training for Dieters,” offers these tips:

1. Stop Cheating: You wouldn’t cheat on your spouse in a committed relationship, so why would you cheat on something as important as your diet and health? Sounds harsh, but if you’re going to get fit, it’s all or nothing, even at the holidays.

2. Expect Challenges: You know the cravings and other challenges are going to come up, so don’t let them catch you off guard. Have a plan in place to push forward when this happens so you stay compliant to your diet.

3. Take Responsibility: Realize that ultimately being fit and healthy is completely your responsibility, and blaming the holidays for your weight gain is just as bad as blaming other outside factors the rest of the year such as restaurants, the food manufacturers and portion sizes.

4. Don’t Eat For Pleasure: Find happiness in the holidays not from food, but in time spent with friends and family creating a lifetime of memories and new traditions. Begin to see eating only as a means to increase health, energy and vitality.

5. Remember Your Why: Most people fail because they forget their ‘Why’ or reason for wanting to lose weight. One of the best ways to stay motivated is to create a vision board filled with pictures of lean, fit and sexy people. Hang it in a very visible location. Daily exposure to the vision board will reinforce your health goals.

6. Just Say No: There’s plenty of peer pressure at the holidays to try your mother’s homemade apple pie or best friend’s mashed potatoes. Just say ‘No’ and stop worrying about what they think. If they truly care about you, they’ll understand that your diet is important to you.

7. Ask The Question: Before you put anything in your mouth, always ask yourself, “How is this food going to impact my health?” Think long and hard about your answer and the potential consequences that will come.

8. Don’t Associate Dieting With Drudgery: If you’re on a diet during the holidays, don’t look at dieting as drudgery, but see it as a strategy for a lifetime to keep you healthy, looking good and feeling great.

9. Don’t Let Yourself Start Over: It’s not okay to start over again on Monday or after the holidays. It’s a common psychological trap with the core belief being, “I can eat the same and get different results.” Starting over on Monday is an endless loop that keeps people fat forever.

1o. Don’t Be Ashamed To Let People Know You’re Dieting: Most people won’t admit they’re dieting at the holidays because they don’t trust themselves enough to put their word on the line. By telling everyone you know creates additional pressure and motivation to propel forward when the going gets tough. It’s the tactically intelligent thing to do.

 

5 Reasons High Fructose Corn Syrup Will Kill You

IF YOU CAN’T CONVINCE THEM, CONFUSE THEM – Harry Truman

The current media debate about the benefits (or lack of harm) of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) in our diet misses the obvious. The average American increased their consumption of HFCS (mostly from sugar sweetened drinks and processed food) from zero to over 60 pounds per person per year.

During that time period, obesity rates have more than tripled and diabetes incidence has increased more than seven fold. Not perhaps the only cause, but a fact that cannot be ignored.

Doubt and confusion are the currency of deception, and they sow the seeds of complacency. These are used skillfully through massive print and television advertising campaigns by the Corn Refiners Association’sattempt to dispel the “myth” that HFCS is harmful and assert through the opinion of “medical and nutrition experts” that it is no different than cane sugar. It is a “natural” product that is a healthy part of our diet when used in moderation.

Except for one problem. When used in moderation it is a major cause of heart disease, obesity, cancer, dementia, liver failure, tooth decay, and more.

Why is the corn industry spending millions on misinformation campaigns to convince consumers and health care professionals of the safety of their product? Could it be that the food industry comprises 17 percent of our economy?

The Lengths the Corn Industry Will Go To

The goal of the corn industry is to call into question any claim of harm from consuming high fructose corn syrup, and to confuse and deflect by calling their product natural “corn sugar”. That’s like calling tobacco in cigarettes natural herbal medicine.

In the ad, the father tells us:

Like any parent I have questions about the food my daughter eats–-like high fructose corn syrup. So I started looking for answers from medical and nutrition experts, and what I discovered whether it’s corn sugar or cane sugar your body can’t tell the difference. Sugar is sugar. Knowing that makes me feel better about what she eats and that’s one less thing to worry about.”

Physicians are also targeted directly. I received a 12-page color glossy monograph from the Corn Refiners Association reviewing the “science” that HFCS was safe and no different than cane sugar. I assume the other 700,000 physicians in America received the same propaganda at who knows what cost.

In addition to this, I received a special “personal” letter from the Corn Refiner’s Association outlining every mention of the problems with HFCS in our diet–whether in print, blogs, books, radio, or television. They warned me of the errors of my ways and put me on “notice”. For what I am not sure. To think they are tracking this (and me) that closely gives me an Orwellian chill.

New websites like www.sweetsurprise.com and www.cornsugar.com help “set us straight” about HFCS with quotes from professors of nutrition and medicine and thought leaders from Harvard and other stellar institutions.

Why is the corn industry spending millions on misinformation campaigns to convince consumers and health care professionals of the safety of their product? Could it be that the food industry comprises 17 percent of our economy?

But are these twisted sweet lies or a sweet surprise, as the Corn Refiners Association websites claim?

What the Science Says About HFCS

Let’s examine the science and insert some common sense into the conversation. These facts may indeed come as a sweet surprise. The ads suggest getting your nutrition advice from your doctor (who, unfortunately, probably knows less about nutrition than most grandmothers).

Having studied this for over a decade, and having read, interviewed, or personally talked with most of the “medical and nutrition experts” used to bolster the claim that “corn sugar” and cane sugar are essentially the same, quite a different picture emerges and the role of HFCS in promoting obesity, disease, and death across the globe becomes clear.

Last week over lunch with Dr. Bruce Ames, one of the foremost nutritional scientists in the world, and Dr. Jeffrey Bland, a nutritional biochemist, a student of Linus Pauling, and I reviewed the existing science, and Dr. Ames shared shocking new evidence from his research center on how HFCS can trigger body-wide inflammation and obesity.

Here are 5 reasons you should stay way from any product containing high fructose corn syrup and why it may kill you.  

  1. Sugar in any form causes obesity and disease when consumed in pharmacologic doses.Cane sugar and high fructose corn syrup are indeed both harmful when consumed in pharmacologic doses of 140 pounds per person per year.When one 20 ounce HFCS sweetened soda, sports drink, or tea has 17 teaspoons of sugar (and the average teenager often consumes two drinks a day) we are conducting a largely uncontrolled experiment on the human species.Our hunter gatherer ancestors consumed the equivalent of 20 teaspoons per year, not per day. In this sense, I would agree with the corn industry that sugar is sugar. Quantity matters. But there are some important differences.
  2. HFCS and cane sugar are NOT biochemically identical or processed the same way by the body. High fructose corn syrup is an industrial food product and far from “natural” or a naturally occurring substance. It is extracted from corn stalks through a process so secret that Archer Daniels Midland and Carghill would not allow the investigative journalist Michael Pollan to observe it for his book The Omnivore’s Dilemma. The sugars are extracted through a chemical enzymatic process resulting in a chemically and biologically novel compound called HFCS. Some basic biochemistry will help you understand this. Regular cane sugar (sucrose) is made of two-sugar molecules bound tightly together– glucose and fructose in equal amounts.The enzymes in your digestive tract must break down the sucrose into glucose and fructose, which are then absorbed into the body. HFCS also consists of glucose and fructose, not in a 50-50 ratio, but a 55-45 fructose to glucose ratio in an unbound form. Fructose is sweeter than glucose. And HFCS is cheaper than sugar because of the government farm bill corn subsidies. Products with HFCS are sweeter and cheaper than products made with cane sugar. This allowed for the average soda size to balloon from 8 ounces to 20 ounces with little financial costs to manufacturers but great human costs of increased obesity, diabetes, and chronic disease.Now back to biochemistry. Since there is there is no chemical bond between them, no digestion is required so they are more rapidly absorbed into your blood stream. Fructose goes right to the liver and triggers lipogenesis (the production of fats like triglycerides and cholesterol) this is why it is the major cause of liver damage in this country and causes a condition called “fatty liver” which affects 70 million people.The rapidly absorbed glucose triggers big spikes in insulin–our body’s major fat storage hormone. Both these features of HFCS lead to increased metabolic disturbances that drive increases in appetite, weight gain, diabetes, heart disease, cancer, dementia, and more.But there was one more thing I learned during lunch with Dr. Bruce Ames. Research done by his group at the Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute found that free fructose from HFCS requires more energy to be absorbed by the gut and soaks up two phosphorous molecules from ATP (our body’s energy source).

    This depletes the energy fuel source, or ATP, in our gut required to maintain the integrity of our intestinal lining. Little “tight junctions” cement each intestinal cell together preventing food and bacteria from “leaking” across the intestinal membrane and triggering an immune reaction and body wide inflammation.

    High doses of free fructose have been proven to literally punch holes in the intestinal lining allowing nasty byproducts of toxic gut bacteria and partially digested food proteins to enter your blood stream and trigger the inflammation that we know is at the root of obesity, diabetes, cancer, heart disease, dementia, and accelerated aging. Naturally occurring fructose in fruit is part of a complex of nutrients and fiber that doesn’t exhibit the same biological effects as the free high fructose doses found in “corn sugar”.

    The takeaway: Cane sugar and the industrially produced, euphemistically named “corn sugar” are not biochemically or physiologically the same.

  3. HFCS contains contaminants including mercury that are not regulated or measured by the FDA. An FDA researcher asked corn producers to ship a barrel of high fructose corn syrup in order to test for contaminants. Her repeated requests were refused until she claimed she represented a newly created soft drink company. She was then promptly shipped a big vat of HFCS that was used as part of the study that showed that HFCS often contains toxic levels of mercury because of chlor-alkali products used in its manufacturing.(i) Poisoned sugar is certainly not “natural”.When HFCS is run through a chemical analyzer or a chromatograph, strange chemical peaks show up that are not glucose or fructose. What are they? Who knows? This certainly calls into question the purity of this processed form of super sugar. The exact nature, effects, and toxicity of these funny compounds have not been fully explained, but shouldn’t we be protected from the presence of untested chemical compounds in our food supply, especially when the contaminated food product comprises up to 15-20 percent of the average American’s daily calorie intake?  
  4. Independent medical and nutrition experts DO NOT support the use of HFCS in our diet, despite the assertions of the corn industry. The corn industry’s happy looking websiteswww.cornsugar.com and www.sweetsurprise.com bolster their position that cane sugar and corn sugar are the same by quoting experts, or should we say misquoting … Barry M. Popkin, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, has published widely on the dangers of sugar-sweetened drinks and their contribution to the obesity epidemic. In a review of HFCS in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition,(ii)he explains the mechanism by which the free fructose may contribute to obesity.He states that: “The digestion, absorption, and metabolism of fructose differ from those of glucose. Hepatic metabolism of fructose favors de novo lipogenesis (production of fat in the liver). In addition, unlike glucose, fructose does not stimulate insulin secretion or enhance leptin production. Because insulin and leptin act as key afferent signals in the regulation of food intake and body weight (to control appetite), this suggests that dietary fructose may contribute to increased energy intake and weight gain. Furthermore, calorically sweetened beverages may enhance caloric over-consumption.”He states that HFCS is absorbed more rapidly than regular sugar and that it doesn’t stimulate insulin or leptin production. This prevents you from triggering the body’s signals for being full and may lead to over-consumption of total calories. He concludes by saying that:“… the increase in consumption of HFCS has a temporal relation to the epidemic of obesity, and the overconsumption of HFCS in calorically sweetened beverages may play a role in the epidemic of obesity.”The corn industry takes his comments out of context to support their position. “All sugar you eat is the same.”

    True pharmacologic doses of any kind of sugar are harmful, but the biochemistry of different kinds of sugar and their respective effects on absorption, appetite, and metabolism are different, and Dr. Popkin knows that.

    David S. Ludwig, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, and a personal friend, has published extensively on the dangers and the obesogenic properties of sugar-sweetened beverages.

    He was quoted as saying that “high fructose corn syrup is one of the most misunderstood products in the food industry.” When I asked him why he supported the corn industry, he told me he didn’t and that his comments were taken totally out of context.

    Misrepresenting science is one thing, misrepresenting scientists who have been at the forefront of the fight against obesity and high fructose sugar sweetened beverages is quite another.

  5. HFCS is almost always a marker of poor-quality, nutrient-poor disease-creating industrial food products or “food-like substances”. The last reason to avoid products that contain HFCS is that they are a marker for poor-quality, nutritionally-depleted, processed industrial food full of empty calories and artificial ingredients. If you find “high fructose corn syrup” on the label you can be sure it is not a whole, real, fresh food full of fiber, vitamins, minerals, phytonutrients, and antioxidants. Stay away if you want to stay healthy. We still must reduce our overall consumption of sugar, but with this one simple dietary change you can radically reduce your health risks and improve your health.While debate may rage about the biochemistry and physiology of cane sugar versus corn sugar, this is in fact beside the point (despite the finer points of my scientific analysis above). The conversation has been diverted to a simple assertion that cane sugar and corn sugar are not different.

The real issues are only two.

  • We are consuming HFCS and sugar in pharmacologic quantities never before experienced in human history–140 pounds a year versus 20 teaspoons a year 10,000 years ago.
  • High fructose corn syrup is always found in very poor-quality foods that are nutritionally vacuous and filled with all sorts of other disease promoting compounds, fats, salt, chemicals, and even mercury.

These critical ideas should be the heart of the national conversation, not the meaningless confusing ads and statements by the corn industry in the media and online that attempt to assure the public that the biochemistry of real sugar and industrially produced sugar from corn are the same.

Now I’d like to hear from you …

Do you think there is an association between the introduction of HFCS in our diet and the obesity epidemic?

What reason do you think the Corn Refiners Association has for running such ads and publishing websites like those listed in this article?

What do you think of the science presented here and the general effects of HFCS on the American diet?

Please leave your thoughts by adding a comment below—but remember, we can’t offer personal medical advice online, so be sure to limit your comments to those about taking back our health!

To your good health,

Mark Hyman, MD

References

(i) Dufault, R., LeBlanc, B., Schnoll, R. et al. 2009. Mercury from chlor-alkali plants: Measured concentrations in food product sugar. Environ Health.26(8):2.

(ii) Bray, G.A., Nielsen, S.J., and B.M. Popkin. 2004. Consumption of high-fructose corn syrup in beverages may play a role in the epidemic of obesity. Am J Clin Nutr. 79(4):537-43. Review.

New Research Finds This American Favorite Causes Early Death

The commonly used ingredient high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) has been linked to numerous health issues, leading countless individuals to shun any products containing the ingredient. Well new research shows that this is in fact the right move, finding that consuming high fructose corn syrup in ‘normal’ quantities is more toxic than sucrose or table sugar, leading to a reduced lifespan and hampered reproduction.

The study showed that when fed a diet containing 25% of calories from added fructose and glucose carbohydrates found in corn syrup, female mice died at a rate 1.87 times higher than female mice on a diet in which 25% of calories came from sucrose (table sugar). What’s more, the mice on the fructose-glucose diet produced about 26% fewer offspring.

“This is the most robust study showing there is a difference between high-fructose corn syrup and table sugar at human-relevant doses,” says biology professor Wayne Potts, senior author of a new study scheduled for publication in the March 2015 print issue of The Journal of Nutrition.

The research, funded by the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation, is among the first to differentiate between the effects of the fructose-glucose mixture found in corn syrup and sucrose, or table sugar, said University of Utah biology professor Wayne Potts, senior author of the paper.

Potts says the debate over the relative dangers of fructose and sucrose is important because:

“…when the diabetes-obesity-metabolic syndrome epidemics started in the mid-1970s, they corresponded with both a general increase in consumption of added sugar and the switchover from sucrose being the main added sugar in the American diet to high-fructose corn syrup making up half our sugar intake.”

But this may not even be the most concerning news regarding the ingredient. In light of recent research on HFCS, it’s important to look back at one landmark study that revealed the presence of ultra-toxic mercury within the ingredient. Mercury is, as all of the experts admit, toxic in all of its forms. And as the study by the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy found, nearly a third of 55 popular brand-name food and beverage products that listed HFCS as the first or second ingredient were found to contain it.

Yet food corps are still trying to peddle HFCS-containing products on the public despite it being a health threat. They are even renaming the ingredient as to trick consumers, as a growing number of people are refusing to buy HFCS-laden food products.

In fact, individuals are steering away from sugar in general more than ever as the ingredient is quickly becoming known as a primary culprit when it comes to the development of nearly all disease. It even fuels cancer almost like no other substance we are consuming, and should be completely avoided to starve cancer cells.

James Ruff, the study’s first author and a postdoctoral fellow in biology, says:

“Our previous work and plenty of other studies have shown that added sugar in general is bad for your health. So first, reduce added sugar across the board. Then worry about the type of sugar, and decrease consumption of products with high-fructose corn syrup.”

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17 Home Remedies For Blocked or Stuffy Nose

Blocked nose or Stuffy nose is the common term used for the problem Nasal Congestion which if not treated at the earliest will result in sinus problem or even blockage of nose and several other serious issues. Reasons for this stuffy nose can be viruses, increased nasal membrane, allergic reactions and several others which if not resolved at earliest will surely give lot of discomfort to any individual.

 

Boost Your Immune System With Vitamins and Herbs

Can cold-busting vitamin C also help zap congestion? “Vitamin C has been demonstrated in some studies to shorten the duration of a cold and decrease the severity of symptoms — however, it doesn’t directly affect congestion,” says Stringer. So, if you’re battling congestion related to a cold, popping some extra vitamin C may help you get over your cold symptoms faster. But if your congestion is related to allergies, vitamin C won’t bring relief.

 

Drink hot liquids

Hot liquids relieve nasal congestion, prevent dehydration, and soothe the uncomfortably inflamed membranes that line your nose and throat. If you’re so congested you can’t sleep at night, try a hot toddy, an age-old remedy.

 

Use a Humidifier or Vaporizer

Battling a cold or the flu can leave you feeling dried out and dehydrated, so many people turn to humidifiers or vaporizers to relieve congested sinuses. “Extra humidity via humidifiers can provide a lot of relief,” says Stringer. Humidifiers help break up congestion by adding moisture to the air, which helps to thin the mucus in your nose.

 

Garlic

Garlic acts as a natural anti-viral which is quite used in the treatment of viral infections like cold, influenza, sinus that causes stuffy nose to fight against the infection. Garlic contains a pungent taste which releases secretions that helps to drain the nasal passages and makes you breathe comfortably. It also helps to increase your immune system when taken regularly.

 

Ginger

Consumption of fresh grated ginger (1 teaspoon) with a glass of warm water can provide relief from the problem of stuffy nose. An individual can consume a tea prepared with a mix of ginger, lemon juice and honey to obtain effective results.

 

Apple Cider Vinegar (ACV)

Apple cider vinegar helps to clear the stuffy nose by thinning the mucus quickly and drain out the sinuses, if it is taken straight without any flavorings. It helps to clean your nose and nasal passage for a comfortable breath.

 

Tomato Juice

Tomatoes are rich in vitamin C which will boost your immune system and also works to open up the sinuses to remove the mucus and also reduce the inflammation in the vessels.

 

Herbal Tea

Consumption of a tea prepared with the use of different herbs such as chamomile, peppermint and blackberry can provide relief from the problem of stuffy nose. Consumption of a tea prepared with the use of ginger and rosemary leaves can cure the problem of stuffy nose.

 

Hot Soups

Hot chicken soup is a best remedy for stuffy nose as it effectively heals the cold symptoms while giving relief from nasal congestion.  You can also drink vegetable soups to get healed up quickly.

 

Saline nasal sprays

Use saline nasal sprays or make your own salt water rinse to irrigate your nose. Salt-water rinsing helps break nasal congestion while also removing virus particles and bacteria from your nose.

 

Drink more fluids

Drink plenty of fluids to help break up your congestion. Drinking water or juice will prevent dehydration and keep your throat moist. You should drink at least 8 to 10 eight-ounce glasses of water daily. Include fluids such as water, sports drinks, herbal teas, fruit drinks, or ginger ale. Your mother’s chicken soup might help too! (Limit cola, coffee, and other drinks with caffeine because it acts like a diuretic and may dehydrate you.)

 

Onion

Peel off and cut an onion. Smell it for 4-5 minutes. It will clear your nose, giving you relief from nasal congestion.

 

Pepper

Pepper is a great remedy to cure a stuffy nose. Put a teaspoon of black pepper along with a tablespoon of honey in a cup. Fill it with boiling water and let it steep for about 15 minutes. Now, stir it well. Drink this mixture to relieve from a stuffy nose.

 

Spicy Food

Increase your intake of spicy foods while you are suffering from stuffy nose. Include lots of red chillies, onions, ginger and garlic to your food. It will facilitate the easier flow of mucus from nasal passages, thereby relieving you from blocked nose.

 

Eucalyptus Oil

Eucalyptus oil is one of the most effective home remedies to relieve a stuffy nose. Pour a few drops of eucalyptus essential oil on a handkerchief or on a small piece of cloth and inhale its fragrance. You can also pour some on your pillow in order to get the benefit even when you are asleep.

 

Honey

Consumption of honey (2 teaspoons) on a regular basis can treat the problem of stuffy nose. An individual can consume a glass of warm water containing honey (2 – 3 teaspoons) to obtain better results. Honey can be also taken with milk to treat the problem of stuffy nose.

 

Lemon

An individual can apply a mixture prepared with lemon juice (2 teaspoons), black pepper powder(1/4th teaspoon) and a pinch of salt around the nasal area to treat the symptoms of stuffy nose.

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Weaves, braids may speed hair loss in black women

Weaves and braids may contribute to a type of permanent hair loss that appears to be common among black women, a new study has found.

More than one-quarter of the 326 black women who participated in the study had hair loss on the top of their scalp, and of those women, 59 percent had signs of central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia, or CCCA, a poorly understood form of baldness that begins at the crown of the head and leads to scarring.

For many years, CCCA was known as “hot comb alopecia” because it was attributed to the use of hot combs to straighten curly hair. That appears to be a misnomer. Neither hot comb treatments nor chemical relaxers, which were used by more than 90 percent of the study participants, were linked with CCCA in the study, but braids, weaves, and other so-called traction hairstyles that tug at the scalp were.

Black women often maintain these styles for long periods of time, and the stress they exert on the scalp can lead to the development of pus-filled bumps, says the lead researcher, Angela Kyei, M.D., a dermatologist and chief resident at the Cleveland Clinic’s Dermatology and Plastic Surgery Institute. “Over time, these bumps can develop bacteria” that can lead to scarring, she explains.

photo-00151-e1303180374110-300x298Making matters worse, women who are already losing their hair are more likely to favor these hairstyles because they help disguise thinning hair, the study notes.

Black women should consider refraining from using these hairstyles on young children, and they need to think about the consequences for themselves, Kyei says. “If you start to notice this type of hair loss, get evaluated early,” she urges.

The average age of the women with CCCA was 58. The condition often presents itself when women are in their 40s, but it’s sometimes seen in women as young as their 20s and 30s.

It’s not clear from the study that these hairstyles are solely responsible for CCCA, however. Women with the condition tended to have balding maternal grandfathers, and they were also more likely to have diabetes. While only 8 percent of the women overall had type 2 diabetes, 18 percent of those with CCCA did?a “surprising finding,” Kyei says.

Dermatologist Andrew F. Alexis, M.D., the director of the Skin of Color Center at St. Luke’s–Roosevelt Hospital, in New York City, says that more research is needed to confirm a link between CCCA and diabetes. “However, it does suggest that it may be useful for dermatologists to ask their CCCA patients about diabetes and refer them to their primary care physicians for annual screening,” he says.

In the study, which was published Monday on the website of the Archives of Dermatology, researchers asked women from two African-American churches and a health fair in Cleveland about their medical history, family history of hair loss, and hair grooming practices. Dermatologists trained in hair loss examined the women’s scalps and graded them on the degree of hair loss and scarring they exhibited.

traction_alopeciaRaechele Cochran Gathers, M.D., a senior staff physician at the Henry Ford Hospital’s Multicultural Dermatology Center, in Detroit, says that the findings, though preliminary, provide good information about a little-understood condition. “I think that the study’s excellent because it not only gives environmental factor data, which a few other studies have reported on, but also it’s unique in that it’s looking at these medical risk factors,” she says.

In light of the findings, Gathers adds, it’s incumbent upon doctors and hairdressers to make women aware of CCCA and the potential link with traction hairstyles.

By Karen Pallarito, Health.com